Reach and influence prospects by adding them to your mailing list

friday, 8 july of 2011

Reach and influence prospects by adding them to your mailing list

by Trey Ryder

If you have a blue-ribbon list of potential clients you'd like to represent, add their names to your mailing list.

In my CLE seminars, I've found that many lawyers think it's unethical to add names to their mailing list without the prospect's permission. But the bar counsel whom I've heard address this subject say it's fine. (Ethics rules vary from state to state, so to be sure, check with your local bar counsel.)

Some state bar associations forbid direct contact with a person known to need legal services, such as the accident victim whose name you get from the police report. The distinction bar counsel make is that a person "known to need legal services" is different from a person "who might at some future time need legal services."

If you have key companies or prospects you'd like to represent, from what I've heard, you're free to add their names to your mailing list. Then you can send them your newsletter, invite them to seminars, offer to present seminars in-house, and so forth. The same holds true for sources of referrals.

If you're targeting companies in particular, don't limit yourself to adding just one person to your mailing list. Call the office and ask for the names and mailing addresses of key people you want on your list. Then send your communications to all of them.

Before you start communicating with prospects on your mailing list, make sure your marketing materials are designed to generate interactions with prospects. And make sure your materials contain a powerful educational message. This will increase the odds that your prospects will contact you to inquire about your seminars and services.

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© Trey Ryder

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